Ambassadors episode 2 review

Up the police

Published by jamdog on 24th October, 2011.

 Up the police

Up the police

Coming straight from the underground

Aerial Telly supports the police. He is authoritarian on law and order as he sees it as the only progressive position to take. If you believe in democracy you believe in the rule of law. Given that you’re around 7 billion times more likely to be the victim of a serious crime than be falsely accused of one it makes sense even out of naked self-interest. Not that you’d know it watching the feeble-minded’s reaction to post-mortem cartwheel queen Amanda Knox’s bullshit acquittal recently along with her Harry Potturd aping borefriend Rapeyhell Sollecito. "She was railroaded by a hostile justice system – just like Sideshow Bob!" about sums up the level of thinking among certain people. Aerial Telly has a lot to say on that mess which he will get into another time but for now he would like to talk about the rogue cop and his place in TV.

"The rogue cop will always be a powerful icon. He preys on our fear of crime, magnifies it, is dependent upon it. He needs us to believe that human rights have gone too far, that compassion will be taken as weakness, that cruelty is the only kindness."

You see, this week Aerial Telly has been watching Braquo, the upcoming Fx French police drama import. Some of you will recall Aerial Telly’s brilliant series blogs on that other French police drama Spiral for The Guardian, the paper that makes Pukert Turdoch soil his kex. So you will be aware that the portrayal of French police in Spiral might reasonably be characterised as one of violent rule breaking blunder prone wreckheads. That is, until you see Braquo. Then you realise that Berthaud and her crew of flunkies are mere pussycats next to  Eddy Caplan‘s clique who, as you may already have guessed, do not play.

They punch, they kick, they shoot, stab, blackmail, perjure and kill – they are the seven deadly sins incarnate. KRS One had it about right when he said "The police department is like a crew that does whatever they want to do". We are in Vic Mackey’s strike crew territory – deeper than you can imagine.

“Pussy claat lawyers, those fearless defenders of the guilty rich and scrote familia, can eat a dick.”

 The rogue cop will always be a powerful icon. He preys on our fear of crime, magnifies it, is dependent upon it. He needs us to believe that human rights have gone too far, that compassion will be taken as weakness, that cruelty is the only kindness. It’s a seductive, dangerous worldview. Brutality as a default response stops becoming about law enforcement and starts becoming about who we are as human beings.

But that’s in the real world. In drama, we need extremes and we need high-stakes. Gregory House isn’t an occasionally tetchy, quite talented, doctor who reduces swelling, he’s a spectacularly rude, genius doctor who snatches life from death every goddamn day. The clash of strong competing perspectives and people who will stop at nothing to achieve their ends produces great drama. Pussy claat lawyers, those fearless defenders of the guilty rich and scrote familia, can eat a dick.

In summary: support the police, Poxy Knoxy is a convicted liar, Rapeyhell Sollecito is a punk, watch Braquo, the appointment of Phallic McLeish is a war crime, you all still suck.

Aerial Telly, motherfuckers. Remember the name or the name will remember you.

 

Imagined: Monday, 24 October 2011

 

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